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Venus Italica – SC045

An antique Carrara marble sculpture “Venus Italica” after Antonio Canova (1757-1822)

Made in Italy during the 19th century.

 

When the Medici Venus was forcibly removed from the Tribuna of the Uffizi by Napoleon’s forces, King Louis I of Etruria commissioned Antonio Canova to replace the figure. True to nature, Canova submitted a wholly original figure to rival the antiquity, despite originally being asked to sculpt a copy. Canova’s Venus references the Medici Venus in the turn of the neck, but leans slightly forward, adding greater finesse to the proportioning of the figure. The Neoclassical composition also incorporates drapery which is used by Venus to conceal her nudity. This is a distinctly modern gesture, which imbues the figure with a sensuality also seen in seminal contemporary paintings such as Ingres’ Valpinçon Bather and Hayez’ Venus. The Venus Italica became an instant success when it was unveiled in the Palazzo Pitti in 1812. Canova subsequently made a number of versions, including examples for the Marquess of Lansdowne, the Marquess of Londonderry and, ironically, for Napoleon’s brother Lucien.

Canova had a number of highly skilled studio assistants who produced reductions of his sculptures both during his lifetime and after his death, Rome in the first three decades of the 19th century was filled with marble carvers of the first rate producing great work like this sculpture, many of whom worked under Canova.

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Measurements:

Width: 15" (381mm)

Height: 57" (1448mm)

Depth: 18" (457mm)

Price: £28,000 (+VAT)

Product Code: SC045

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Venus Italica – SC045

Venus Italica – SC045

Product Code: SC045

An antique Carrara marble sculpture “Venus Italica” after Antonio Canova (1757-1822)

Made in Italy during the 19th century.

 

When the Medici Venus was forcibly removed from the Tribuna of the Uffizi by Napoleon’s forces, King Louis I of Etruria commissioned Antonio Canova to replace the figure. True to nature, Canova submitted a wholly original figure to rival the antiquity, despite originally being asked to sculpt a copy. Canova’s Venus references the Medici Venus in the turn of the neck, but leans slightly forward, adding greater finesse to the proportioning of the figure. The Neoclassical composition also incorporates drapery which is used by Venus to conceal her nudity. This is a distinctly modern gesture, which imbues the figure with a sensuality also seen in seminal contemporary paintings such as Ingres’ Valpinçon Bather and Hayez’ Venus. The Venus Italica became an instant success when it was unveiled in the Palazzo Pitti in 1812. Canova subsequently made a number of versions, including examples for the Marquess of Lansdowne, the Marquess of Londonderry and, ironically, for Napoleon’s brother Lucien.

Canova had a number of highly skilled studio assistants who produced reductions of his sculptures both during his lifetime and after his death, Rome in the first three decades of the 19th century was filled with marble carvers of the first rate producing great work like this sculpture, many of whom worked under Canova.

Make Enquiry