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Gothic Marble Mantelpiece – 19207

Black Marble Gothic Mantelpiece designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott for Preston Town Hall

Very large in scale and carved during the 1860’s using blocks of Ashford Black marble, quarried from mines in Derbyshire, England. The mantelpiece was removed from Preston Town Hall during the 20th century and installed in a house in nearby Peak District, until this year, when it was acquired by Ryan & Smith.

An imposing castellated shelf rests on half columns carved with pointed Gothic panels and capped with quatrefoil corner blocks. The arched fireplace opening is framed with deeply cut mouldings. Above the arched opening are two Gothic tracery panels which come to a point in the centre of the frieze.

Circa 1860

Sir George Gilbert Scott (13 July 1811 – 27 March 1878)

Sir Gilbert Scott, was an English Gothic revival architect, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and public buildings. He was one of the most prolific architects which Great Britain has produced, over 800 buildings being designed or altered by him.

Scott was the architect of many iconic buildings, including the Midland Grand Hotel at St Pancras Station, the Albert Memorial, and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, all in London, St Mary’s Cathedral, Glasgow, the main building of the University of Glasgow, St Mary’s Cathedral in Edinburgh and King’s College London Chapel.

Preston Town Hall
The Hall was intended to display Preston’s 19th century industrial wealth. It was considered one of the most beautiful town halls in Britain. It was the height of civic pride to have your own purpose built town hall.
The old Town Hall was built in 1862-66 between Fishergate and the Market Square. It was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott, a leading architect in the Gothic revival which is a type of architecture. The Cloth Hall in Ypres, Belgium gave him his inspiration for the town hall.
After Scott’s plans were presented to the town, the officials were unsure of which side should be placed on Fishergate. Scott , a man of little modesty, replied by saying it would look superb regardless of which elevation was chosen for the main street. However it has long been argued that it was built the wrong way round, that the clock tower should have been on the market square.
Preston’s Town Hall was not as large as other districts halls, for example in Manchester, but it had a lot of fine detail. It looked a bit like a church, its clock tower was the 2nd biggest in Britain after Big Ben.
The building burnt down in mysterious circumstances on March 15th 1947. It was reported that the sound of the hour bell falling through the masonry on that night could be heard from miles around.
The council voted to destroy the ruins, which was against the wishes of the public who wanted it rebuilt. The public had put together an 8,000 signature petition to have it saved. The lower part of the building was stabilised until 1962 when Crystal house built here. Crystal house was voted Preston’s least favourite building and the one most gladly demolished.
 
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Measurements:

Width: 90" (2286mm)

Height: 63" (1600mm)

Depth: 15" (381mm)

Internal Measurements:

Width: 41" (1041mm)

Height: 47" (1194mm)

Price: £30,000 (+VAT)

Product Code: 19207

Victorian & Edwardian Make Enquiry

Gothic Marble Mantelpiece – 19207

Gothic Marble Mantelpiece – 19207

Product Code: 19207

Black Marble Gothic Mantelpiece designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott for Preston Town Hall

Very large in scale and carved during the 1860’s using blocks of Ashford Black marble, quarried from mines in Derbyshire, England. The mantelpiece was removed from Preston Town Hall during the 20th century and installed in a house in nearby Peak District, until this year, when it was acquired by Ryan & Smith.

An imposing castellated shelf rests on half columns carved with pointed Gothic panels and capped with quatrefoil corner blocks. The arched fireplace opening is framed with deeply cut mouldings. Above the arched opening are two Gothic tracery panels which come to a point in the centre of the frieze.

Circa 1860

Sir George Gilbert Scott (13 July 1811 – 27 March 1878)

Sir Gilbert Scott, was an English Gothic revival architect, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and public buildings. He was one of the most prolific architects which Great Britain has produced, over 800 buildings being designed or altered by him.

Scott was the architect of many iconic buildings, including the Midland Grand Hotel at St Pancras Station, the Albert Memorial, and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, all in London, St Mary’s Cathedral, Glasgow, the main building of the University of Glasgow, St Mary’s Cathedral in Edinburgh and King’s College London Chapel.

Preston Town Hall
The Hall was intended to display Preston’s 19th century industrial wealth. It was considered one of the most beautiful town halls in Britain. It was the height of civic pride to have your own purpose built town hall.
The old Town Hall was built in 1862-66 between Fishergate and the Market Square. It was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott, a leading architect in the Gothic revival which is a type of architecture. The Cloth Hall in Ypres, Belgium gave him his inspiration for the town hall.
After Scott’s plans were presented to the town, the officials were unsure of which side should be placed on Fishergate. Scott , a man of little modesty, replied by saying it would look superb regardless of which elevation was chosen for the main street. However it has long been argued that it was built the wrong way round, that the clock tower should have been on the market square.
Preston’s Town Hall was not as large as other districts halls, for example in Manchester, but it had a lot of fine detail. It looked a bit like a church, its clock tower was the 2nd biggest in Britain after Big Ben.
The building burnt down in mysterious circumstances on March 15th 1947. It was reported that the sound of the hour bell falling through the masonry on that night could be heard from miles around.
The council voted to destroy the ruins, which was against the wishes of the public who wanted it rebuilt. The public had put together an 8,000 signature petition to have it saved. The lower part of the building was stabilised until 1962 when Crystal house built here. Crystal house was voted Preston’s least favourite building and the one most gladly demolished.
 
Make Enquiry